Sunday, July 20, 2008

AWA's, Unions and Telstra's fight for the "Individual"...

"Rather than being castigated Telstra should be applauded for showing some grit in an otherwise adverse political environment."

TELSTRA has ended discussions with unions about a new enterprise agreement, after accusing them of knowingly putting forward prohibited content as part of a side agreement thus dramatically escalating its stand off with unions by taking the ”unprecedented” step of canceling enterprise negotiations.

In a move immediately condemned by the ACTU, Telstra announced it had pulled out the talks, accusing unions of putting up ‘’unlawful’’ workplace proposals that, if accepted, would jeopardise Telstra’s broadband plans.

Granted that the present standoff relates to a memorandum of understanding that the ACTU is seeking to attach to the enterprise agreement, (a side accord that the company says it improper under existing workplace laws) however, this matter goes to the heart of a far broader issue.

Is there anything inherently wrong and/or immoral for a company to negotiate directly with its employees? Telstra has argued that employees can earn up to 50 percent more on AWA’s, I would add, those employees whose choice is to do so.

To provide employees - the individuals – the universal right to makes his/her own decision to trade his/her product and enterprise, in order to develop and achieve as much as he/she is not merely capable of, but as far as ambition will carry.

Does Capitalism not demand the best of every being, and will it not reward accordingly? Society is progressively more, asserting that we stand with others - the collective, and that the resisters be unjustly castigated.

There was no break, the reply coming without the slightest of delay. David’s poise was notable but in some way, it was also grotesque to Joseph.

Said Ayn Rand, "The man who lets a leader prescribe his course is a wreck being towed to the scrap heap."

A well known highly innovative and successful multinational recognised the value of the individual long ago ...

"Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits.The rebels.The troublemakers.The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules.And they have no respect for the status quo. You can praise them, disagree with them, quote them,disbelieve them, glorify or vilify them.About the only thing you can't do is ignore them.Because they change things. They invent. They imagine. They heal.They explore. They create. They inspire.They push the human race forward. Maybe they have to be crazy. How else can you stare at an empty canvas and see a work of art?Or sit in silence and hear a song that's never been written?Or gaze at a red planet and see a laboratory on wheels? We make tools for these kinds of people. While some see them as the crazy ones,we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do."
Apple Inc. 1998

Crazy ones CANNOT thrive and differentiate themselves within a collective bargaining process, I know one such individual who could not; I know him through and through … and through …

It remains to be seen if the Rudd Government adheres to its advertised commitment to neutrality between union and non-union collective agreements, the signs are ominous …

Rather than being castigated Telstra should be applauded for showing some grit in an otherwise adverse political environment. ...

I'll take The Welch Way and its fundamental principles of differentiation any day...

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